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IHO / OHI > IHO > Hydrographic Dictionary > S-57 Terms 11 - 22


S-57 Terms 11 - 22
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ihbpah
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 Posted: Thu Nov 18th, 2010 02:04 pm

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This is the second group of terms from TSMAD.

Attachment: S-57_Terms_11-22.zip (Downloaded 7 times)

ihbpah
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 Posted: Thu Nov 18th, 2010 02:06 pm

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I attach my initial thoughts regarding this second group of terms.

Attachment: S-57_Terms_11-22_SS.zip (Downloaded 8 times)

JerryMills
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 Posted: Tue Mar 1st, 2011 10:15 pm

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I'm having a very difficult time with this set of terms.  S-32 defines beacon as a "prominent specially constructed object forming a conspicuous MARK as a fixed aid to navigation... Also called day beacon or day mark." and mark as a "charted conspicuous object, structure, or LIGHT serving as an indicator for guidance or warning of a craft; a BEACON".  The two terms seem to be synonymous. 

Further evidence of that is in Bowditch where beacon is defined as a "fixed artificial navigation mark" and mark is defined as an "artificial or natural object of easily recognizable shape or color, or both, situated in such a position that it may be identified on a chart.  A fixed artificial navigational mark is often called a BEACON.  This may be lighted or unlighted."  The only difference I can see between these two  is that a mark could be natural!

In my mind, a mark is a daymark (unlighted) and a beacon is lighted or is a radio beacon.  I realize that doesn't agree with either of the above authoritative documents.

If we agree that mark and beacon have essentially the same meaning, I would prefer not to have separate definitions for isolated danger beacon & isolated danger mark, lateral beacon & lateral mark, etc.  Instead, I suggest we list the term as isolated danger beacon (mark), lateral beacon (mark), etc. and define it once instead of twice.

14.  Safe water beacon - I too have concerns about "how close to the beacon (mark) is it safe to navigate?"  However, since it is essentially already in S-32 as "safe water mark" it seems we should retain it.  Here is the definition from the IALA MARITIME BUOYAGE SYSTEM website - "Marks indicating Safe water. They indicate that water is navigable around the mark and they do not show any hazards. They can be used to mark, eg a fairway axis or as approach signs."  From this I suggest we slightly amend the current S-32 definition to: "In the IALA Maritime Buoyage System a safe water mark (beacon) or buoy indicates there is navigable water around its position with no hazards."

15. through 18.  I agree with Steve's recommendations.

19.  Isolated danger buoy - I suggest incorporating this into 12.

21.  Safe water buoy - I agree,  no need for a separate entry.

22.  Special purpose/general buoy - I agree,  no need for a separate entry.

JerryMills
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 Posted: Thu Mar 3rd, 2011 02:34 pm

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I have done some additional research on this by reviewing the IALA International Dictionary of Aids to Navigation webpage which was last updated in July 2010 and the U.S. Coast Guard Aids to Navigation Manual.  Without going into too much detail, a mark (navigational) is an alternative term for (Visual) Aid to Navigation and includes both buoys and beacons (which are fixed artificial navigation marks).  That is, mark is the more generic term.  As such, there is no need in my opinion, to include separate terms such as lateral beacon, safe water beacon, special beacon, etc. but rather include definitions for lateral mark, safe water mark, special mark, etc. as well as an expanded definition of mark per IALA and the USCG.  See below for my recommendations: 

mark (navigation) - An artificial or natural object of easily recognisable shape or colour, or both, situated in such a position that it may be identified on a chart or related to a known navigational instruction.  Alternative term for visual aid to navigation.  Includes both buoys and beacons (fixed artificial navigation mark).

beacon - A fixed artificial navigation mark that can be recognised by its shape, colour, pattern, topmark or light character, or a combination of these.  It may carry various additional aids to navigation.  This term is not commonly used when the navigation mark can be classified as a lighthouse.

11.  Cardinal beacon - do not include (see new definition for cardinal mark)

12.  Isolated danger beacon - do not include (see new definition of isolated danger mark)

13.  Lateral beacon - do not include (see new definition of lateral mark)

14.  Safe water beacon - do not include (see new definition of safe water mark)

15.  Special purpose/general beacon - do not include (retain definition of special mark)

16.  Anchor berth – OK

17.  Cardinal buoy - do not include (see new definition for cardinal mark)

18.  Installation buoy – do not include

19.  Isolated danger buoy - do not include (see new definition of isolated danger mark)

20.  Lateral buoy - do not include (see new definition of lateral mark)

21.  Safe water buoy - do not include (see new definition of safe water mark)

22.  Special purpose/general buoy - do not include (retain definition of special mark)

Cardinal mark:  A mark used in conjunction with the compass to indicate where the mariner may find the best navigable water.  It is placed in one of the four quadrants (North, East, South and West) bounded by inter-cardinal bearings from the point marked.  CARDINAL BUOY, CARDINAL BEACON

Isolated danger mark:  A mark erected on, moored over, or placed immediately adjacent to an isolated danger of limited extent, which has navigable water all around it. ISOLATED DANGER BUOY, ISOLATED DANGER BEACON.   Note: Wording in red is from US Coast Guard which I believe improves the definition.
 

JerryMills
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 Posted: Thu Mar 3rd, 2011 02:41 pm

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The following three proposed new definitions were omitted from my previous posting.  I also note that the red type color and yellow highlighting were omitted so I am sending this entire posting as an attachment via e-mail.

Lateral mark:  A mark used to indicate the port or starboard side of the route to be followed. They are generally used for well defined channels and are used in conjunction with a conventional direction of buoyage.  LATERAL BUOY, LATERAL BEACON. See LATERAL SYSTEM.
 
Safe water mark:  In the IALA Maritime Buoyage System a safe water mark indicates that there is navigable water around its position with no known nearby hazards.  Note: Wording in red paraphrased from IALA Navigation Aids website to show distinction from isolated danger mark.  SAFE WATER BUOY, SAFE WATER BEACON
Special mark:   In the IALA Maritime Buoyage System, special marks are not primarily intended to assist safe navigation but to indicate a special area or an object mentioned on charts or other nautical documents.  Note:  Revised definition is from current S-32 definition plus paraphrased from IALA Navigation Aids website and US Coast Guard.  SPECIAL BUOY, SPECIAL BEACON

ihbpah
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 Posted: Thu Mar 31st, 2011 03:25 pm

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I am happy with the proposals made by Jerry. I have prepared a new document incorporating Jerry's views and presenting the definitions as amendments to the existing S-32 definition where it exists. Red italic = new text and strikethrough = deleted text. I suggest that we use this document as thye basis for any further discussion.

Attachment: S-57_Terms_11-22_SS+JM.zip (Downloaded 2 times)

JerryMills
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 Posted: Tue Apr 12th, 2011 08:00 pm

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I concur except the definition for "Special mark" seems redundant.  I recommend deleting the red italics type up to the semicolon.  the resulting definition would be:

Special mark: 

In the IALA Maritime Buoyage System, a special marks is not primarily intended to assist NAVIGATION are not primarily intended to assist safe navigation but to indicate a special area or an object mentioned on CHARTs or other NAUTICAL documents. 

 

If you rather retain "feature" vice "object" that's fine with me.


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